Dalmore 15

Dalmore 15

Dalmore 15

~

Ladies and gentlemen, it has been far far too long since we’ve been able to bring you a review. Sniff and I have been busy with the holiday’s and work and whatnot and we’ve been using the other social media platforms to at least prove we’re still tasting and writing reviews.
It’s a new year and we’re also starting to branch out into new types of liquors. Keep an eye out and let us know what you think. On with the review!
 ~
COLOR: Tawny with glints of red when the light hits it just right
NOSE: Sherry. This is an amazing sherry bomb. The mixture of the 3 sherry casks definitely show in the nose. Along with that, the telltale Dalmore orange peel. It’s like walking into a chocolate store, walking passed the chocolate covered raisins and dates, then looking into the back room and finding that it’s actually a front, and they’re selling sherry out the backdoor to whomever wants it.
PALATE: The spices arrive and coat the tongue and then the orange-ish tangerine sweetness enters the room, but leaves with a tartness, like accidentally eating a large portion of pith. Like other Dalmore, the christmas spices and cake-like breadiness make this dram incredibly delicious and dessert-like. Vanilla and caramel icing drizzled on a mocha coffee cake come to mind, or possibly just eating a sweet cake while visiting a coffee roaster.
FINISH: The finish is a medium length, drying. You’re left with a hint of vanilla, orange and white pepper.
 ~
Dalmore was the first scotch I ever tried. The sweetness was inviting and welcoming for someone who hadn’t tried a Scotch whisky before. The Dalmore 12 is a good entry level scotch and the 15 year old is a nice continuation if not a predictable extension.
 Scotch Out.
Slainte Mhath!

Lagavulin 16

Lagavulin 16

Lagavulin 16

~

COLOR: The color of the bottle is lovely, a vintage look to it with awesome font…Oh the whisky, it’s a rusty bronze with hints of dirty fallout water.
NOSE: Who’s on fire? I smell a camp fire, with the spit of meat still turning over the barely lit embers. Beef jerky is drying on the side with a soy based glaze. Ash, tobacco and cigar box are very present, like just stepping out of a cigar store but never smoking. There is a light sherry aspect and a mineral like seashell with a light whiff of mint. Water brings out an amazing red fruit that was hiding being the fire pit somewhere, cherry and raspberry. Do I like? I like =)
PALATE: My taste buds were surely tested over this scotch but look deep and you’ll find walnut shell, charred oak and fresh pine. Oh and leather. It is sweet, an enjoyable sweet that offsets the massive smoke bomb. A menthol note carries through to the palate like having licked a friends menthol cigarette (it had to have been a friend, why would I go around licking other peoples cigarettes?).
FINISH: The campfire feel carries all the way through to the end. The embers are now all charred ash, wood smoke abounds and oddly enough there’s a light spearmint. What an interesting flavor to get a mint note through the entire tasting. I really enjoyed the mint.
 ~
All packaging aside, I’m not very much a fan of this scotch. People love it and swear by it. Those are probably the same people who love blowing up the price of Ardbeg and Oban. If you like intensely smokey and peaty scotches, these are your winners. If you don’t, please continue with us as we pull away from these smoke bombs and get back to tasting the wonderful caramel, honeyed and toffee scotches that we love so dearly.
Scotch Out.
Slainte Mhath!

Tomatin 12

photo 2

Tomatin 12

~

COLOR: Golden wheat
NOSE: Tomatin brought grains and bread to mind on first sniff. Heavy in the malt and wheat bread smells. Then figs and juicy pear sweetness. With the addition of spring water toffee and vanilla caramels and a stronger pear fragrance arrived. For being 12 years old, it has developed a very complex nose.
PALATE: At first sip the pear comes right out, along with granny smith apples without the tartness. Spice and oak develop on the tongue while swirling it around. Freshly grated nutmeg and sweet salt-water taffy.
FINISH: The finish here is much longer than expected, but single noted with an interesting cigar box like finish. Spicy and drying.
 ~
I’d seen this scotch at my liquor store forever and it was always on sale for $25. Since it was always on sale I never wanted to pick it up. And then it went on sale for $18 dollars and I said I have to have it. Even if it’s bad, I’ll still feel good about trying it. Who knew that it would be far more complex then I ever thought it would be. Why is no one buying this?? My guess is, it’s the perception of price to quality. No one wants to buy something that’s always on sale because they assume it’s of poor quality. This is still a Scottish single malt, aged for 12 years and spending time in expensive sherry casks. This is a nice neat drinker and probably solid in your Rob Roys or Bloody sand cocktails.
Reach outside of your norm and enjoy!
Slainte Mhath!

Aberlour A’Bunadh


A'Bunadh

Aberlour A’Bunadh

~

COLOR: Dark caramel
NOSE: I immediately get dark dried fruits like dark raisins, dried figs and dried apple skins. Then baking spices like nutmeg, hints of cinnamon and orange rind. It smells very sweet of brown sugar and un-refined low grade honey.
PALATE: Spicy and smooth oak finish. Breathe in gently because the 60.4% alcohol by volume will burn the hairs out of your nose. A little spring water quiets down the bite and brings out an AWESOME SWEET ROUNDNESS. The baking spices intensify and then bourbon characteristics arise. Delicious.
FINISH: The finish is deliciously lengthy and stays in your mouth and nose for a while before needing to take another sip. It’s got nice body and weight on the tongue. Reminds me of some fine cognacs in nose and palate.
 ~
A’Bunadh seems to be the go to for the Aberlour brand and I can see why people rave about it. If you didn’t know what scotch tasted like, but you know you like a good bourbon, A’Bunadh is your go to. A great place to start and a great place to finish your night.
Slainte Mhath!